Archive

Archive for the ‘Ask A Vet’ Category

Bladder And Kidney Stones In Dogs And Cats – Diagnose, Treatment & Prevention

July 5, 2016 Leave a comment

There are assorted things which can contribute to the formation of urinary tract stones. If there is the concentration of mineral salts are very high in the urine, it forms layers on layer. It may happen down the tract in the bladder or in the kidneys.

What Causes Bladder And Kidney Stones in Pets?

The urine should be naturally acidic in pets. Some of the mineral salts are not soluble in alkaline urine. This particle gets precipitated out in the urine as individuals, small crystals which are microscopic. As time goes these crystals unite and gradually turn into stones. The other reason to form the stone, is due to dehydration which helps to increase the concentration of minerals within the urine.

Bladder And Kidney Stones In Dogs And Cats

What Are the Signs And Symptoms Of Bladder And Kidney Stones In Dogs And Cats?

The following are the signs and symptoms of bladder and kidney stones could include:

  • Urinate frequently (Pollakiuria)
  • Straining to urinate (Dysuria)
  • Blood in the urine (Haematuria)
  • Abdominal discomfort
  • Fever
  • Kidney pain
  • Lethargy
  • Poor Appetite
  • Vomiting
  • Weight Loss
  • Licking the genetial area more than normal

How To Diagnose The Bladder And Kidney Stones in Pets?

If you find any of the signs or symptoms in your canine or feline take your pet to the veterinarian. The vet will examine and perform some of the tests that involve diagnostic imaging such as ultrasounds, x-rays and maybe need to perform other procedures such as CT scan or MRI. Urinalysis and blood tests in the first step to visualize the bladder or kidney stone in pets.

What Is The Treatment For Bladder And Kidney Stones For Pets?

If your pet has diagnosed with a bladder or kidney stones there are many treatment options: Your vet may prescribe a special diet or homemade recipes which will help to manage and try to dissolve the stones. The diets will increase the thirst in your pet to encourage more dilute urine, which will help to dissolve the stones. These diets have to be given to your pets for at least 3 to 4 months. Antibiotics are often given during this treatment period to analyze if the stones are slowly getting dissolved. If it is the critical stage the vet will remove it through the surgery.

How To Prevent The Bladder And Kidney Stones In Dogs And Cats?

To prevent the occurrence or recurrence of bladder or kidney stones, you need to increase your pet’s water consumption, which helps to prevent crystal formation in the urinary tract. There are also special diets which can be used for your pet. To resolve your pet’s urinary tract infection you can help to prevent the recurrent kidney stones from forming.

Tip: You can add a small amount of salt to your pet’s water bowl which will increase the amount of water that your pet drinks.

Ask A Vet’s January $100 Prize Winner

February 2, 2011 Leave a comment

Whopper - Mitch's Golden Retriever pup

Congratulations to Mitch C. De Sevrn Jacquet who won our $100 prize question of the month in January.

Mitch asked

“What is the difference between hair and fur? I was told that dogs that are hypoallergenic like Poodles and Lhaso Apso’s have hair as opposed to fur. We seem to be more sensitive to our Golden Retriever than our Lhaso Apso.”

Our Vet answered

“Chemically there is no difference, hair and fur are from the same chemical ingredient called keratin. The only difference is how we people have learned to use the two words; we call it ’hair’ if it is growing on us and on animals that do not have dense follicles, such as pigs and elephants. We usually call the dense hair that grows on animals such as bears, lions and tigers ’fur’. As our cats and dogs have similarly dense hair, it is commonly referred to as ’fur’. However, lately the fur of companion animals has been called ’coat’ as another term, perhaps in order to underline their role in our life.

It may be that, due to Golden Retrievers naturally having quite a dense coat, he sheds more than your Lhasa Apso. As you probably know, the allergens causing problems in humans are protein from dogs saliva and dander. Breeds that shed less are more likely to be hypoallergenic as they do not spread the allergen as heavily.”

Question of the Month Prize

As the winner of our monthly competition, Mitch wins a $100 prize. If you have a question that you would like our veterinary surgeon to answer, get in touch and ask your pet-related question today.

Ask A Vet on BudgetPetCare

 

Ask A Vet Question Of The Month Winner of December

January 24, 2011 Leave a comment
Lady, the Labrador Retriever

Lady, the Labrador Retriever

Congratulations to Cathy Goolsby who won our $100 prize question of the month in December.

Cathy asked
“Is there a safe product to give dogs to calm them when it is storming? Lady is terrified – she walks every step with me, jumps on the bed if it is night, and shivers. Thank you for your help.”

Our In-House Vet answered
“Your dog suffers from noise phobia which means she expresses an intense response to loud noises like the ones from storms. To treat this kind of problems you have to be very patient. There are several groups of medicines which can help…”

Read more of our vet’s answer here

Question of the Month Prize

As the winner of our monthly competition, Cathy wins a $100 prize. If you have a question that you would like our veterinary surgeon to answer, get in touch and ask your pet-related question today.

Ask A Vet on BudgetPetCare

Ask A Vet Question Of The Month November

December 21, 2010 Leave a comment
BudgetPetCare :: Ask A Vet Winner December 2010

Xena :: Biewer Terrier

The winner of November’s $100 Ask A Vet feature on BudgetPetCare.com has been announced – congratulations go to Janice Keys who asked:

“Is advantage safe for a pregnant dog?

Our In-House Vet answered

Advantage is for topical use and can be used on pregnant bitches. Care should be taken to avoid the contents of the tube coming into contact with the eyes or mouth of the user or recipient animal. Do not allow recently treated animals to groom each other…

Read more of our vet’s answer here

Question of the Month Prize

As the winner of our monthly competition, Janice wins a $100 prize. If you have a question that you would like our veterinary surgeon to answer, get in touch and ask your pet-related question today.

Ask A Vet on BudgetPetCare

Ask A Vet Question of the Month Winner

June 16, 2010 Leave a comment
Question of the month

Question of the month

The winner of May’s Ask A Vet feature on BudgetPetCare.com has been announced – congratulations go to Judy Thompson who asked:

A rep from frontline told me that you could use a small dog supply and and divide it 3 ways to use on three cats. He said it would not hurt and be less expensive and we could keep all our cats protected. Is this true and what size would I use to get the right amount. These cats are inside cats.

Our in-house vet answered:

Frontline Plus has the same ingredients for cats and dogs but the quantity is different between the two species. Both products, Frontline for cats and Frontline for Dogs, have fipronil and S-methoprene as their active ingredients. As you probably know fipronil is a powerful insecticide which will kill all fleas and ticks, and S-methoprene is a growth hormone regulator...

To read the full answer click here.

$100 Winner of the Month

As the winner of our monthly competition, Judy wins a $100 prize.  If you have a question that you’d like our veterinary surgeon to answer, get in touch and ask your pet-related question today.

Ask Our Vet – your pet health questions answered

June 16, 2010 Leave a comment

Question from Diana Healy

I have a yorkie, Gidget who is 8 years old and a puppy, Misha, pom who is 4.5 months old. Misha picks on Gidget and Gidget just snaps at her. Can Misha hurt Gidget? Also, with their weight being so small should I use just 1/2 a pipe of Frontline on each dog? Thanks, Diana

Our Vet Says:

Dogs living in the same household have hierarchies and have a similar way of behaving with youngsters like humans.

Misha is still very young and it is seen as a child by Gidget. She will not intentionally hurt her until she is a few months older and hormones develop, but in the meantime she will correct her. Around the time when Misha will be reaching the adult stage of her life these fights will increase for a period of time until they find their equilibrium in the house.

To read the rest of this answer, please visit our main Ask Our Vet section on BudgetPetCare.com

Categories: Ask A Vet, Dogs Tags: , , ,